Wednesday, November 18, 2015

More is More

If I've learned one thing since moving to New York and entering the design scene here, it's that more is more.  Because most NYC townhouses and apartments are smaller square footage-wise, it becomes increasingly important to utilize every inch.  And what better way to make a statement than with one bold color or pattern throughout the space?  Of course it's a risk, and can easily become distasteful, but if executed well the result can be breathtaking:


In the room above, decorator Tom Scheerer chose Clarence House's Vase wallpaper in blue to line the hallway walls and main stairwell of this Rhode Island home.  I think the busy pattern works here because these spaces are more of pass-through areas, rather than rooms where you would gather or sleep within.  

And in this breakfast nook, Lourdes Gutierrez used Quadrille's happy Arbre de Matisse fabric in jungle green:


I love the mix of the bright green with the sleek white Knoll Platner arm chairs and Saarinen dining table.   

And as a big fan of cherry red, I do love this sitting room by Miles himself.  The varying heights of the furniture as well as the over-scaled table lamp give the room a bit of quirk.


The impressive guest room at Michael S. Smith's Rancho Mirage home features a canopy bed, headboard and wall upholstery all in the same fabric.  Definitely a risky move- but I feel Smith executed the look seamlessly.


Another interesting technique is to blend the wall coverings with the window treatments, like Michelle R Smith did here:


While I'm not normally drawn to orange, I do dig this bedroom.  I do have the urge to pop in a contrasting color to break it up a bit though, like cobalt blue or palm leaf green.


Speaking of leaves, how fun is this tiny bathroom?  Even the Matouk towels have a green piping detail.


I think the most fail-proof space to do a bold pattern or color is the powder bath or guest bathroom.  Since these spaces are tiny and enclosed, a loud look can really pack a punch without spilling over and having to work with adjoining rooms. 

So what's your take- are you a fan of pattern or color saturation?
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